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Vinyl/ cassettes to CD


Tony.T
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As an aside to copying video to DVD, I've been asked by several people if we can convert vinyl records and/ cassette tapes to CD.

Well I'll be launching this service in the next few days.

How is it done you ask? Well in fact the way to do it can cost you nothing, you may well have all you need at home just gathering dust !!

Firstly watch this-

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Mq5CSJ7LzrU

Then if you haven't got a record deck buy one of these off e-bay,   160289317962

If you need a cassette deck, buy one off e-bay, I've just bought a top of the range s/h technics deck for

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I think there are copyright issues, the same ones that stop us doing films and tv shows on video to DVD. As i understand it the personal use bit is when you do the copying yourself for your own use. If you copy for others and charge, you are infringing copyright.I'm not a lawyer so I might be wrong but thats how it was explained to me.

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Copyright is a problem however if the item is a home recording for home use then it becomes a grey area. You could make your own copyright release form where the customer takes on copyright responiblity. Records and prerecorded material are really a no no, but as time passes by this service will become more important. The turn will not be huge but a valueable service to offer for little cost.

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You are allowed by law to have a backup of digital media, this includes CD's and even software.. well this used to be the case not so long back anyway :)

So if we assume this is still the case and we get the customer to sign a copyright indemnity form then we should be in the clear?

Anyone got any wording we can use for a form?

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My understanding is that if any copyrighted material (photo film video cd etc)is brought in for copying it should be turned away if it has a copyright notice on it that clearly identifes the copyright holder.My rule is that i turn down this work. If an item comes in that appears to come from a professional source but is not stamped copyright then i copy it with an indemnity form. The copyright holder has a very weak case if he doesnt identify himself and asserts his copyright. The trouble with using an indemnity form on clearly copyrighted material is that you know it shouldnt be copied and if anyone comes after you its a poor defence that you passed the buck to your customer, most if whom dont have a clue what you are talking about!

The trouble  is if you turn down the work someone else will do it without worrying about such details. And big companies like making examples a little ones.

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I think it's a bit of a can of worms. My general rule is if in doubt don't take the work, not worth the worry.

I think if you are talking about vinyl records and pre-recorded audio cassettes, then they will be covered by copyright and it's probably irrelevant as to weather they are still available or not.

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My understanding is that if any copyrighted material (photo film video cd etc)is brought in for copying it should be turned away
Again, if some one does some investigationg into this whole issue I am almost 100% sure that you have a legal right to back up in case you suffer a loss or damage to your original, and this also included photographs.
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Copyright is a complicated issue. As has been mentioned, usualy you are allowed to make 'backup' copies of software, which is mentioned in 'terms and conditions'.

For dvd/cd/vinyl, I have looked, but cannot find, such a clause. This is a grey area, and arguments can be made for and against. If we transfer this to an area that we all feel at home with, i.e. Proffessional Photographer's work, how would you react if someone asked you to make a copy of one of your customers work that you had only printed a few days previously, purely for backup?

I have turned down an awfull lot of this kind of work, and seen it being done by others (mainly Tesco). But an interesting point, SINCE AIRING MY DISGUST OF THIS PRACTICE BY THE LARGE SUPERMARKETS, ON THIS FORUM, MY LOCAL TESCO HAS STOPED THE PRACTICE (thanks Neil!). Tesco would not stop doing this without a serious reason.

As with VHS to DVD, transferring vinyl/tape to CD would be a proffitable service to offer, and one I would certainly like to do, but without clarification and direction I could not afford to take the risk.

Maybe the PMA could give some direction on this?

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